Friday, February 12, 2010

Other Traditions?

This Amish quilt exploration has been making me wonder about other quilting traditions. I know about African American quilts and Pakistani quilts but can't really think of any more. Then there are traditional American quilts, the ones we all know about, but who else makes quilts? It could be pretty inspiring to work in some other styles, too. Of course I liberate everything I do becausev that's how I enjoy working..... Laura, Woo lywoman.

9 comments:

Jewel said...

I know there are British quilts too... I can't remember all of the details but I remember seeing an article about it somewhere.

YankeeQuilter said...

There are some gorgeous Indian and Pakistani quilts. This month the International Quilt Study Center has a display of them. There is also a quilting history/style in Wales that is wonderful (though more of the quilting than the piecing style.) Within the US there are some regional styles as well...

laura said...

Well, there is Hawaian applique, Celtic applique, Seminole patchwork

KnitOneQuiltTooKristin said...

Molas, Welsh quilting designs. I think there are more textile traditions than we normally think about, but they might not necessarily be considered traditional quilts.

nicolette said...

I don}t participate in this project, but I love to follow the posts on this blog.

How about the art of tentmaking in Cairo, Egypt. They use wonderful appliques. It is said that the tradition of making quilts comes from Egypt, thousands of years ago!

Rosebud said...

I recently heard of traditional Korean quilting method of pojagi – which uses pieced and quilted wrapping cloths. Google it, many I found are quite liberated and liberally use solids.

Ati. said...

There are many, many quilts in the museums in the Netherlands, already from 1700! Most of them were paperpieced. The first ones are not quilted but have a whole cloth as a back.They were used as bedcovers. Fabrics came often from the Coromandel coast ( India) colorful and flowers.The Dutchies sailed all the oceans in that time and have been trading people for ages. I have a reproquilt made of this fabrics in the '90.

Susan said...

Someday it will be us that constitute a type of quilting - Internet community quilts.

Lazy Gal Tonya said...

I immediately thought of the pojagi quilts and the Tentmaker Applique. Great book to check out: Quilting, Patchwork and Applique: A World Guide by Caroline Crabtree and Christine Shaw.